Amazon

Sunday, January 27, 2019

Ancillary Departments


Ancillary Departments
These are service areas usually acting as the link between the kitchen and the food service areas. They are always behind the scenes or “back-of-the-house” the service themselves are some of the busiest unit of a catering establishments, especially over a service period.
Because of this it is important that, department heads ensure that all staff know exactly what their duties are and how to carry them out efficiently and quickly.
In general, especially in large operations from main service areas can be distinguished

1)     Still room
2)     Pantry
3)     Food Pick up Area/ Hot Plate
4)     Linen Room
5)     Store
6)     Wash up/ Kitchen Stewarding
7)     Silver room / plate room

1. STILL ROOM
This is a service area whose main function is to provide items of food & beverages required for the service of meal and not catered for by other major departments in a hotel such as the kitchen, larder and bakery.

Depending on its size and the duties to be performed the staffing will be made. Normally the still room is looked after by a still room supervisor. He/she is responsible for staffing, ordering of supplies and effective control of these items when issued to various departments.

Following are some of the items that are dispense from the still room.

a.      All beverages such as coffee, tea, Hot chocolate etc
b.      Assorted fruit juices both fresh & canned
c.      Milk and cream
d.      Sugars {different types like granulated, cube, brown sugar (demerara)}
e.      Preserves: Jam, marmalade, honey etc (They are normally pre-portioned for better control.)
f.       Butter – it can curled or pre-wrapped portions
g.      Toasted bread Slices, Melba Toast
h.      Breakfast rolls such as Brioche, croissants etc
i.        Assorted breakfast cereals- Cornflakes, Rice crispies, Muesli (mixed of all cereals)etc
j.        Pastries, Gateaux and sandwiches
k.      Porridge and boiled eggs.
From the above list, one can easily understand that all the items required are dispense from Still room
Some of the equipments which are required by the still room

        i.           Refrigerator
     ii.           Tea and coffee dispenser.
   iii.           Salamanders or toasters
   iv.           Bread slicing machines
      v.           Working table tops and cutting boards
   vi.           Large double sink
 vii.           Storage cupboard-for all dry items held in stock such as paper napkins, doilies etc.
viii.           Storage space or shelves- for storing crockery, glassware and cutlery.


2. Pantry

It is used to indicate all back area collectively. Still rooms, Pantry, washup area, store are all collectively referred to as a pantry in a commercial operations but pantry specifically refers to that area where mise-en-place (preparation for service) is carried out. It is the most important area and should be given considerable importance in planning stage.

Different activities are carried out in this area such as:

            i.      Wiping of al cutlery, crockery and glassware.
          ii.      Refilling of cruet set, sauce bottle and sugar bowl
        iii.      Storing out dirty and fresh linen.
        iv.      Storage of stationery
           v.      Sometimes briefing is also done in the pantry
        vi.      Ice cube machine is placed in this area.
      vii.      If there is no plate room, cleaning of silverware also takes place in this area.


3. Food Pick up Area/ Hot Plate

This area is also known as Hot Plate Area. The hot plate may be regarded as the meeting point between the food service staff (F&B) and the food preparation staff (kitchen).

This is a place where all the crockery required for service will be kept warm. Care should be taken to make sure that the amounts of chinaware required are properly stacked in the hot case. In some hotels the silver required will be placed on top of the hotplate and used as required.

Normally an ‘ABOYEUR’ (a barker) is in-charge and controls the hotplate over the service periods. The hotplate is usually gas or electricity operated and should be lit well in advance of the service to ensure all the china and silver are sufficiently heated. Once a dish is ready to serve the Aboyeur will announce it loudly so that the respective waiter can pick it up. Once the food has been picked up the KOT (kitchen order ticket) is put into a control box which can be operated only by a member of the control department who for control purposes makes the copy of the food check from the kitchen.


4. Linen Room

Linen storage is necessary in the F&B Department. All linen such as Serviettes, Table cloths, Slip cloths etc are stored in the F&B department as it is very difficult for the service staff to run to the house keeping department each time to get fresh linen and smooth operation is hampered.

Linen is exchanged everyday by the waiter in the Linen room (house keeping department) on a ‘one for one basis’ which means one dirty linen is exchanged for one clean linen. These are entered in the Linen register and if there is any discrepancy it is also entered in the register..
5. Store

The store acts as a area for keeping any supplies that are used during operations. These may include any condiments, soft drinks, juices, disposable items and guest takeaways (such as sugar sachets). There should be adequate supply of the items required during the service and proper requisition of the item should take place, so that there is no short fall.


6. Kitchen Stewarding / wash up Area

This is the most important Ancillary area which influences the functioning of the outlet. The department which is responsible for the supply and maintenance of all F&B equipments (cutlery, crockery and glassware) and kitchen utensils is known as Kitchen stewarding Department. Kitchen stewarding is the backbone of the F&B department.

In Kitchen Stewarding department, the wash up area occupies the maximum area and is fitted with different equipments. The wash up area is further divided into two:

a) Pot wash: This area is also known as “Scullery”. It is a place for cleaning kitchen pots, pans and other kitchen utensils. It is usually located near the main kitchen.
b) Ware wash / dish washing area: This section is responsible for cleaning off all types of service equipments. It is generally located near the restaurant and room service elevator to minimize the distance of carrying soiled equipment by the waiter. In dish washing area, all cutlery, crockery and glassware are kept separately (to avoid any breakage) and all food debris is put into wet garbage bin and all dry garbage like paper doilies, paper napkin in a separate garbage bin known as dry garbage bin.
DISH WASHING METHODS
When washing the crockery and cutleries one must make sure that the temperature of the water being used is around 75oC. This is done for two reasons:-
1) To sterilize the plate and remove oil stains
2) The china ware or crockery will dry by itself (because of high temperature) without using a wiping cloth therefore being more hygienic
1) Manual or tank method: - This method is used in smaller hotels where the turnover of the crockery’s and cutleries is not very high. In manual wash, two sink method or three sink method is used.
In the cleaning process, washing of equipment with hot water and detergent and rinsing takes place in first sink (in case of three sink method; washing and rinsing in separate sinks). These are then transferred to another sink for sanitization. This method tends to have higher breakages.
2) Automatic conveyor method or Dish washing Machine: - This is used in hotels where turnover is very high. To operate the machine continuous supply of water is required.
In the cleaning process, Plates are arranged on the racks and are rinsed before placing them on the conveyor belt, where it enters the machine. The machine comprises of three chambers. In 1st chamber, the equipments come in contact with water at high pressure from top as well as bottom. In 2nd chamber, the equipments come in contact with a spray of mixture of soap and water at 85oC from above and below and in 3rd chamber the equipments are sprayed with hot water at 90-95oC from top and bottom and sterilization takes place. The cleaning cycle is completed in 21/2 to 3 Minutes.

7. Plate Room/Silver Room
The silver room holds the complete stock of silver and other equipments required for service of all meals along with slight surplus stock for emergency. The various types of silver are kept here on labeled shelves, with all the service plates of one size stacked together. Heavier items should go on the shelves lower down and lighter items higher up. Cutlery, flatware, hollowware and other smaller items are usually stored in drawers lined with baize, as this helps to reduce noise, slipping and scratching.

In very large establishments, the silver and the plate room may be two separate units, but in the majority of places they are combined and in some cases it is a part of wash-up area.

The service equipments in stores should be cleaned and polished periodically. There are many methods available for cleaning silverware:

a)     Burnishing method: It consists of revolving drum half filled with small ball bearings. The silver to be cleaning is placed in the drum, which is then half filed with water, detergent and is closed tightly and machine is switched on for 10 minutes. This method is not suitable for forks and knifes.

b)      Polivit Method: In this method, Polivit plate which is made up of Aluminum is placed in a container with washing soda and silverware is dipped in the container, with atleast one piece touching the plate. Piping hot water is poured to cover the silverware and chemical reaction cleans the utensils. This method is suitable for large pieces of silverware.

c)     Silver Dip Method: In this method, the silver to be cleaned is kept in a wire basket and is immersed in silver dip, which is a pink colour liquid. It is left in the solution for a very short period and is rinsed afterwards. This method is quick but may damage the silverware sue to chemical reaction.

d)     Plate Powder Method:  This method is ideal for the articles that cannot be cleaned by the above methods. In this method, plate powder (which is pink in colour) is mixed with spirit and is rubbed over the surface of the article. Once the paste is dry, it is rubbed with a clean cloth and is rinsed with hot water. This method demands more labour and time and is suitable for cruet, toast rack etc.


e)     Quick Dip Method: In this method, hot water, along with crushed aluminum foil, lemon juice and salt is placed in a container and stirred. Tarnished silver is dipped in this solution for 2-3 minutes. It is then removed and wiped properly

Thursday, January 24, 2019

Types of Services


Types of Service

Silver Service or Platter-to- Plate Service: This type of service is used in fine dining restaurants and sophisticated night clubs. In this type of service the food is put into a dish and appropriately garnished by the chef. The steward then presents the dish to the guest. After the guest’s approval, the steward proceeds to serve the food from the dish onto the guest’s plate using a service spoon and fork.

American Service or Pre-Plated Service: This as the name suggests is pre-plated service wherein the food is portioned and arranged in the plate by the chef in the kitchen. The steward brings the plated food and places it on the table in front of the guest. This type of service is usually carried out in a coffee shop, where the atmosphere is informal.

Buffet Service: This type of service is used in restaurants and banquets where a large number of guests have to be catered to at one time. It is mainly self-service where a variety of dishes are displayed on a large table and there are only a few service staff stationed behind the table in order to assist the guest, if needed. The guest helps himself to a plate and cutlery which is placed at one end of the buffet table. The guest then proceeds to help himself to the food or requests the service staff to assist him. The guest then returns to his table to sit down and eat.

English Service: In this form of service the food is brought from the kitchen in dishes by the steward and presented to the host for his approval. After the approval is obtained the steward places the dishes on the table. The host then portions out the food and serves it to his guests.

French Service: This service involves minimal use of the steward’s skills. The steward brings the food in dishes from the kitchen and places the dishes on the table. He then places the plates on the table next to the dishes. The guests then proceed to help themselves.

Grill Room Service: This form of service calls for the food, mainly meats and poultry, to be grilled in front of the guest. The meats or poultry are displayed and grilled behind a glass partition, so that the guest can select his choice of cut and watch it being cooked. The food is then pre-plated from the kitchen and sent to the guest.

Room Service: This is a unique type of service where a guest places his order for food and beverage, on the telephone. The steward/waiter then delivers the food to the guest in his room and ensures that the guest settles the bill. No actual service of food and beverage is done by the steward/waiter unless requested for by the guest.

Gueridon Service: This is a service where a single dish or a complete meal is cooked at the guest’s table in the restaurant. Generally, the dish is partially cooked in the kitchen and the process is completed at the table. The cooking is done on a Gueridon trolley which is a mobile trolley with a portable gas cylinder, gas burner and other essential equipment. The steward exhibits a lot of showmanship and dexterity, as he has to carve, flambé and prepare food in the presence of all the guests in the restaurant.

Snack-bar Service or Counter Service: In this service, tall stools are placed at a counter, and covers are laid on the counter, so that guests can eat their food at the counter itself. The guest can choose from food items listed on the menu card.

Cafeteria Service: All hotels have cafeterias for staff where this type of food service is carried out. The food is displayed behind the counter. The staff member indicates his choice to the counter attendant. The food is then served pre-plated and the cutlery is handed over to the staff. The staff may then sit at the tables provided for eating.

Misen

‘Mise-en-place’ means ‘putting in place’ and the term is attributed to the preparation of the restaurant for ultimate smooth service. To ensure that the restaurant is ready for service, the waiter makes sure that his station has been efficiently prepared for service. A ‘station’ is a section of a restaurant which comprises of a given number of tables which are attended to by a specific team of stewards/waiters. A ‘station’ is headed by a ‘Captain’.

‘Mise-en-scene’ commonly refers to preparing the environment of the restaurant in order to make it pleasant, comfortable, safe and hygienic. Before each service session, the restaurant should be made presentable enough to accept guests.

Tuesday, January 15, 2019

Meal & Menu Planing

MEALS & MENU PLANNING

MENU

Introduction
Menu is the statement of food and beverage items available or provided by food establishments primarily based on consumer demand and designed to achieve organizational objectives. It represents the focal point around which components of food service systems are based. The menu is designed carefully what the outlet wants to cater for, keeping in mind the type of clientele. The main advantage of a well-planned menu is that it leads to consumer satisfaction. It also helps to motivate the employees for a responsible and successful service

A. Origin of Menu
Originally the "bill of fare", as it is termed in English, or menu in French, was not presented at the table. The banquet consisted of only two courses, each made up of a variety of dishes, anything from 10 to 40 in number. The first 10-40 dishes were placed on the table before the diners entered- hence the word entrée- and, when consumed were removed or relieved by 10-40 other dishes- hence the words relevés and removes came into existence.

B. Objectives of Menu Planning
The aim of menu planning is to:
1. Meet nutritional needs -- ““Recognition that food is treatment”-- part of medical therapy
2.Plan meals within the food cost
3.Simplify purchase, preparation, and storage of meals
4.Provide attractive, appetizing meals with no monotony
5. Save time and money
6.Minimize overhead expenditure, i.e., fuel, electricity, water, labor.
7.Meet//exceed customer expectations
8.Determine production methods and distribution systems
9.Dictate staffing levels
10.Provide quality,, standardization & predictability
Menu planning is the most important aspect of planning and organization in the food industry. It is an advance plan of a dietary pattern over a given period of time.

MENU PLANNING

INTRODUCTION
Menu planning is one of the important managerial activities of food and beverages operations executed by a team comprising the entrepreneur/proprietor, the restaurant manager, and the executive chef. In a large hotel, the general manager and the food and beverage (F&B) manager will also be members of the team. In welfare catering operations, the head of the institution, the catering manager, and the finance manager will be involved. Menu planning calls for careful thought on many factors that would determine the success of the F&B operation. Menu forms the basis or acts as a guide upon which all other managerial and operational activities of F&B operations rest on.

POINTS OR FACTORS TO BE CONSIDERED WHILE PLANNING THE MENU

Whether it is for new outlets or existing outlets, points related to the following aspects should be considered by the team while planning the menu:
1. Operations hour
The team must consider policy on operation hours of the business while planning menu. If it is operating throughout the day from morning 7 to night I l, then all dishes required during breakfast, mid morning, lunch, evening snacks, dinner, and so on, should be included. If it is going to be operational only during lunch and dinner, then the menu should be planned accordingly. During lunch hour operations, guests expect quick service or business/executive lunch, which should be taken into account.
2. What to serve
The policy of the management may not permit the inclusion of beef, pork or any of the non. vegetarian dishes, genetically modified food, and so on. Dishes included in menu should be the framework of the establishment's policy.
3. Production process
The type of production process the business is going to implement, such as traditional partie system centralized production, cook-chill, cook-freeze, and sous-vide, and so on, should be taken into account while planning the menu.
4. Use of convenience products
Convenience products of many categories, from ones requiring some amount of final preparation in the kitchen to ready-to-eat forms, are available in the market. The team must consider policy on usage of convenience products.
5. Style of service
Menu should be planned taking into account the style of service to be implemented. For example, buffet, silver, American, tray service, takeaway, and so on.
6. Type of menu
The type of menu to be implemented in operations should be borne in mind while planning the menu. The la carte menu will offer extensive choice under each category and table d'hôte menu will have a set number of courses with a limited choice at set price.

C. Types of Menu
The menu are basically of two types:-
 À la carte
 Table d'hôte
À la Carte menu
The term à la carte may be translated as 'from the card'. This type of menu may be defined by the following points:
 It gives a full list of all the dishes that may be prepared by the establishment
 Each dish is priced separately
 A certain waiting time has to be allowed for many of the dishes
 Some dishes are cooked to order
This type of menu may be offered on its own in a first-class establishment, or in conjunction with a form of table d'hôte or carte du jour menu in a smaller catering establishment. The dishes may be changed according to season- oysters, melon, asparagus, game- but each item will remain individually priced.
Table d'hôte
The definition of table d'hôte menu is covered by the following points:
 The menu has fixed number of courses
 There is a limited choice within each course
 The selling price of the menu is fixed
 The dishes provided will all be ready at a set time
This type of menu may be offered by itself or in conjunction with an à la carte or carte du jour menu. It is the more popular and simpler form of menu, being easier to control and operate and giving less wastage of food. The set price of the table d'hôte menu is charged whether or not the full menu is consumed.

D. Courses of French Classic Menu

The number of courses on a menu, and dishes within each course, depends on the size and class of the establishment. In an establishment where full food preparation and service brigades are in full operation a full menu may be offered. In this case the courses or sections of the menu may be divided as follows:
1. Hors-d'oeuvre
2. Potage (Soup)
3. Ouefs (Egg)
4. Farineux (Rice and Pasta)
5. Poisson (Fish)
6. Entrée
7. Sorbet
8. Relevé
9. Rôti (Roast)
10. Légumes (Vegetables)
11. Salades (Salads)
12. Buffet Froid (Cold Buffet)
13. Entremet (Sweet)
14. Savoureux (Savoury)
15. Fromage (Cheese)
16. Dessert (Fresh Fruit)
17. Beverages

MEALS & MENU PLANNING
MENU
Introduction
Menu is the statement of food and beverage items available or provided by food establishments primarily based on consumer demand and designed to achieve organizational objectives. It represents the focal point around which components of food service systems are based. The menu is designed carefully what the outlet wants to cater for, keeping in mind the type of clientele. The main advantage of a well-planned menu is that it leads to consumer satisfaction. It also helps to motivate the employees for a responsible and successful service

A. Origin of Menu
Originally the "bill of fare", as it is termed in English, or menu in French, was not presented at the table. The banquet consisted of only two courses, each made up of a variety of dishes, anything from 10 to 40 in number. The first 10-40 dishes were placed on the table before the diners entered- hence the word entrée- and, when consumed were removed or relieved by 10-40 other dishes- hence the words relevés and removes came into existence.

B. Objectives of Menu Planning
The aim of menu planning is to:
1. Meet nutritional needs -- ““Recognition that food is treatment”-- part of medical therapy
2.Plan meals within the food cost
3.Simplify purchase, preparation, and storage of meals
4.Provide attractive, appetizing meals with no monotony
5. Save time and money
6.Minimize overhead expenditure, i.e., fuel, electricity, water, labor.
7.Meet//exceed customer expectations
8.Determine production methods and distribution systems
9.Dictate staffing levels
10.Provide quality,, standardization & predictability
Menu planning is the most important aspect of planning and organization in the food industry. It is an advance plan of a dietary pattern over a given period of time.

MENU PLANNING

INTRODUCTION
Menu planning is one of the important managerial activities of food and beverages operations executed by a team comprising the entrepreneur/proprietor, the restaurant manager, and the executive chef. In a large hotel, the general manager and the food and beverage (F&B) manager will also be members of the team. In welfare catering operations, the head of the institution, the catering manager, and the finance manager will be involved. Menu planning calls for careful thought on many factors that would determine the success of the F&B operation. Menu forms the basis or acts as a guide upon which all other managerial and operational activities of F&B operations rest on.

POINTS OR FACTORS TO BE CONSIDERED WHILE PLANNING THE MENU

Whether it is for new outlets or existing outlets, points related to the following aspects should be considered by the team while planning the menu:

1. Operations hour
The team must consider policy on operation hours of the business while planning menu. If it is operating throughout the day from morning 7 to night I l, then all dishes required during breakfast, mid morning, lunch, evening snacks, dinner, and so on, should be included. If it is going to be operational only during lunch and dinner, then the menu should be planned accordingly. During lunch hour operations, guests expect quick service or business/executive lunch, which should be taken into account.

2. What to serve
The policy of the management may not permit the inclusion of beef, pork or any of the non. vegetarian dishes, genetically modified food, and so on. Dishes included in menu should be the framework of the establishment's policy.

3. Production process
The type of production process the business is going to implement, such as traditional partie system centralized production, cook-chill, cook-freeze, and sous-vide, and so on, should be taken into account while planning the menu.

4. Use of convenience products
Convenience products of many categories, from ones requiring some amount of final preparation in the kitchen to ready-to-eat forms, are available in the market. The team must consider policy on usage of convenience products.

5. Style of service
Menu should be planned taking into account the style of service to be implemented. For example, buffet, silver, American, tray service, takeaway, and so on.

6. Type of menu
The type of menu to be implemented in operations should be borne in mind while planning the menu. The la carte menu will offer extensive choice under each category and table d'hôte menu will have a set number of courses with a limited choice at set price.

C. Types of Menu
The menu are basically of two types:-
 À la carte
 Table d'hôte
À la Carte menu
The term à la carte may be translated as 'from the card'. This type of menu may be defined by the following points:
 It gives a full list of all the dishes that may be prepared by the establishment
 Each dish is priced separately
 A certain waiting time has to be allowed for many of the dishes
 Some dishes are cooked to order
This type of menu may be offered on its own in a first-class establishment, or in conjunction with a form of table d'hôte or carte du jour menu in a smaller catering establishment. The dishes may be changed according to season- oysters, melon, asparagus, game- but each item will remain individually priced.
Table d'hôte
The definition of table d'hôte menu is covered by the following points:
 The menu has fixed number of courses
 There is a limited choice within each course
 The selling price of the menu is fixed
 The dishes provided will all be ready at a set time
This type of menu may be offered by itself or in conjunction with an à la carte or carte du jour menu. It is the more popular and simpler form of menu, being easier to control and operate and giving less wastage of food. The set price of the table d'hôte menu is charged whether or not the full menu is consumed.

D. Courses of French Classic Menu
The number of courses on a menu, and dishes within each course, depends on the size and class of the establishment. In an establishment where full food preparation and service brigades are in full operation a full menu may be offered. In this case the courses or sections of the menu may be divided as follows:
1. Hors-d'oeuvre
2. Potage (Soup)
3. Ouefs (Egg)
4. Farineux (Rice and Pasta)
5. Poisson (Fish)
6. Entrée
7. Sorbet
8. Relevé
9. Rôti (Roast)
10. Légumes (Vegetables)
11. Salades (Salads)
12. Buffet Froid (Cold Buffet)
13. Entremet (Sweet)
14. Savoureux (Savoury)
15. Fromage (Cheese)
16. Dessert (Fresh Fruit)
17. Beverages

F. TYPES OF MEALS

Food and beverage service is about serving the customers when they are hungry. However F&B outlets offer a typical variety of food depending on customers demand, type of operation, location etc. The most important meals of the day are:
(i) Early morning tea [EMT]: Most often these orders are placed with the room service and it consists of a choice of tea and coffee served with cookies or biscuits. Service is expected to be fast and timing of this meal is from 4.am to 6.am in the morning.
(ii) Breakfast: Breakfast, Elevenses, High tea and Supper are considered the subsidiary meals of the day. Whereas Lunch and Dinner are the two main meals. Although light (lite), the smaller meals fulfill nutritional requirements of and when required if properly planned, divide the day into even food breaks. Breakfast is considered as one of the most important meal nutritionally.
(iii) Brunch or elevenses: The word 'brunch' comes from a combination of lunch and breakfast. It refers to a heavy meal eaten around 11 am by guests who wish to skip lunch or those who hate missed breakfast. Today brunch has become very popular in coffee shops and multi-cuisine restaurants, especially marketed extensively on these days.
(iv) Lunch and Dinner: These are main meals of the day. All F&B outlets cater to these meals. The variety of service differs from buffet and pre-plated in coffee shops, silver service in multi-cuisine restaurants.
Food and beverage service is about serving the customers when they are hungry. However F&B outlets offer a typical variety of food depending on customers demand, type of operation, location etc. The most important meals of the day are:
(i) Early morning tea [EMT]: Most often these orders are placed with the room service and it consists of a choice of tea and coffee served with cookies or biscuits. Service is expected to be fast and timing of this meal is from 4.am to 6.am in the morning.
(ii) Breakfast: Breakfast, Elevenses, High tea and Supper are considered the subsidiary meals of the day. Whereas Lunch and Dinner are the two main meals. Although light (lite), the smaller meals fulfill nutritional requirements of and when required if properly planned, divide the day into even food breaks. Breakfast is considered as one of the most important meal nutritionally.
(iii) Brunch or elevenses: The word 'brunch' comes from a combination of lunch and breakfast. It refers to a heavy meal eaten around 11 am by guests who wish to skip lunch or those who hate missed breakfast. Today brunch has become very popular in coffee shops and multi-cuisine restaurants, especially marketed extensively on these days.
(iv) Lunch and Dinner: These are main meals of the day. All F&B outlets cater to these meals. The variety of service differs from buffet and pre-plated in coffee shops, silver service in multi-cuisine restaurants.

Ancillary Departments

Ancillary Departments These are service areas usually acting as the link between the kitchen and the food service areas. They are alway...