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Showing posts from June, 2010

EQUIPMENT HANDLING

Sanitation Standards in Handling Service Equipment


1. Use clean and sanitized glasses, flatware, chinaware and
other equipment for service.
2. All service equipment must be wiped dry with clean cloths
to avoid watermarks. The cloths used for this purpose
must be segregated from other wiping cloths.
3. Bowls should be underlined with appropriate underliner
and never to be served with the finger touching the rim.
4. When serving straw serve them with their wrappers or in
their respective dispensers.
5. When serving additional utensils or napkin, place them in
a small plate to avoid direct contact with hand.
6. The thumb should be kept away from the plate to avoid
touching the sauce, meat or dish.
7. When setting up flatware and glasses, avoid leaving
finger marks; carry them in trays or with a cloth napkin.
8. Never serve food using cutleries that have fallen on the
floor.
9. To avoid contamination, food must be covered when it is
not served immediately.
Never serve utensils, cups, glasses or plates that a…

EQUIPMENT HANDLING

Do's and Dont's of Equipment Handling


1. Dump ice out of the glass; preheat the glass before
pouring hot water. Don't pour hot drinks in chilled or cold
glasses.
2. Stack dishes according to size and kind. Never stack too
high.
3. Handle stemmed glasses by the stem and tumblers by
the base. Never handle glasses in bouquet.
4. Remove glass / china from buspan one at a time. Don't
unload china, glasses at random.
5. Use ice scooper for scooping ice. Never use the glass for
scooping ice.
6. Never put cutlery into glasses, put them in appropriate
containers.
7. Make sure of an adequate back-up supply of glassware
for rush periods.
8. Always be on the lookout for cracked or chipped
glassware and remove them.
9. Never allow glass-to-glass contact on overhead racks,
keep distant from each other.
10. Never overload the tray / buspan. Load only what it can
conveniently accommodate.

11. Never buss glasses in the sink. Buss them directly onto
divider racks.
12. Never stack glasses. Use trays and avoid…

EQUIPMENT HANDLING

Measures to Avoid Breakages


• Use trays when serving and bussing.
• Proper system should be followed in stacking and storing
equipment.
• Use appropriate door for entry and exit. A separate door
for entering and eiting should be installed to prevent
collision.
• Use appropriate glass racks. Make sure that the glasses
are conviniently, but not tightly inserted in each rack.
• Buss out glasses separately from chinaware.
• Avoid overloading trays and buspans.

EQUIPMENT HANDLING

Management invests substantial amount in supplies and
equipment. Service staffs are, therefore, expected that these
equipment are handled gently and carefully. Staff should be
sanitation and safety conscious. Equipment should be handled in the
right spot stemmed glass by the stem, tumblers by the base, flatware
by the handle. Bowls should never be held by the rim, use
appropriate underliners. The thumb should never show on the plate.
When setting up cutleries, as well as glasswares, avoid leaving
finger marks by using trays or by securing them inside a cloth
napkin.
To prevent breakage, be conscious of the rules of
equipment handling. Breakages are usually caused by the following
factors:
1. Mechanical Impact -- results from object-to-object
collision. This is induced by stacking of glasswares and
chinawares, picking of glasses in bouquet, overloading of
buspans and trays, putting cutleries inside glasses.
2. Thermal Shock -- result of sudden change of
temperature. This happens when hot water is placed

LINEN

Buffet Cloths
For a buffet table, the minimum size of the tablecloth required
is 2 m x 4 m.


Trolley Cloths and Sideboard Cloths
These are usually made from tablecloths well worn and not
suitable for use on tables, mended by the housekeeping department
and folded to fit a sideboard or trolley.




Waiter’s Cloths or Service Cloths
A service cloth is a very important part of service equipment
as well as being part of the food server’s uniform. It must be kept
clean and ironed at all times and only used as a service cloth for
certain activities such as:
· Carrying hot plates
· Final polishing of plates
· Wiping small spills
· Brushing crumbs onto a service plate
· Wiping the undersides of the plates before placing plates
on the table.
Service cloths are also used by every waiter as protection
against heat and to keep uniforms clean.

LINEN

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Napkins or Serviettes
A napkin or serviette is a rectangle cloth or paper used at the
table for wiping the mouth while eating. It is usually small and folded.
Conventionally, t he napkin is folded and placed to the left of the
place setting, outside the outermost fork. In an ambitious restaurant
setting, it may be folded into elaborate shapes and displayed on the
empty plate. A napkin may also be held together in a bundle (with
cutlery) by a napkin ring. Alternatively, paper napkins may be
contained with a napkin holder.



LINEN

Linens are fabric goods, such as tablecloths, napkins and slip
cloths. Linen is a material made from the fibers of the flax plant.
Originally, many, such as bed sheets and tablecloths, were made of
linen. Today, the term "linen" has come to be applied to all related
products even though most are made of cotton, various synthetic
materials, or blends. The main items of linen normally found in a
restaurant are: tablecloths; slipcloths; buffet cloths; trolley and
sideboard cloths; and waiter’s cloths or service cloths.
4.9.1 Table Cloths
Table linens made from cotton or linen are not only more
absorbent but also last longer. The fibers don't pill or pile as easy as
with synthetic table linens and they don't become shiny when
exposed to an iron's heat. Egyptian cotton and Irish linen are
considered the finest materials for table linens because of their long,
durable fibers. White is the most popular color for table linens
because it's considered formal. Table linens in off whit…

OTHER TROLLEYS

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CHEESE TROLLEY


LIQUEUR TROLLEY


LIQUEUR TROLLEY


LIQUOR TROLLEY


MOBILE BAR


WINE TROLLEY


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TROLLEYS - CARVING TROLLEY

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It is used for carving joints of meat at a guest's table. This trolley
is seldom used in India.




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mail at hoteltrolleys@gmail.com

TROLLEYS - DESSERT TROLLEY

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This trolley serves as a visual aid to selling desserts. Guests are
more likely to order a dessert if they can see what is available,
particularly if it is well presented. Some dessert trolleys are
refrigerated. Gateaux, pastries, jellies, tarts, pies, flans and
souffles can be served from a dessert trolley.




Hotel & Restaurant TrolleysInterested in purchasing Hotel & Restaurant Trolleys? We deal in all types of Trolleys like Gueridon/Flambe Trolley, Wine Trolley, Dessert Trolley, Room Service Trolley, Cheese Trolley........
For a quote:
mail at hoteltrolleys@gmail.com

TROLLEYS - ROOM SERVICE TROLLEY

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This trolley is known for its versatility. It is used for the service to
guests in their rooms. The waiter sets up the meal and covers
on the trolley and wheels it into the guest's room. This trolley
may also be used as a dining table in the privacy of the guest's
room. Beneath the trolley top, provision is made for mounting a
hot case to keep the food warm.







Hotel & Restaurant TrolleysInterested in purchasing Hotel & Restaurant Trolleys? We deal in all types of Trolleys like Gueridon/Flambe Trolley, Wine Trolley, Dessert Trolley, Room Service Trolley, Cheese Trolley........
For a quote:
mail at hoteltrolleys@gmail.com

TROLLEYS - GUERIDON OR FLAMBE TROLLEY

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A gueridon or flambe trolley is a small mobile trolley that can be
placed alongside the guest's table. It consists of one or two
burners, a gas cylinder and a work and storage space for plates
and cooking equipment. Using this trolley, the food is flambed at
the guest's table. Only skilled and well rained waiters are
allowed to handle this service as there is the risk of spoiling food
by overcooking it, and of the flame causing a fire in the
premises.







Hotel & Restaurant TrolleysInterested in purchasing Hotel & Restaurant Trolleys? We deal in all types of Trolleys like Gueridon/Flambe Trolley, Wine Trolley, Dessert Trolley, Room Service Trolley, Cheese Trolley........
For a quote:
mail at hoteltrolleys@gmail.com

SIDE BOARD OR DUMMY WAITER

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SIDE BOARD OR DUMMY WAITER

The style and design of the side board varies from
establishment to establishment. It depends upon:
· The style of service and menu offered.
· The number of waiters working from one sideboard
· The number of tables to be served from one
sideboard
· The amount of equipment it is expected to hold.



It is essential that the side board is of minimum size and
portable so that it may be moved, if necessary. If the sideboard is too
large for its purpose, then it takes up space which could be used to
seat more customers. The top should be of heat resistant material
which can be easily washed down. After service, the sideboard is
either completely emptied out or restocked for the next service.

SIDE BOARD OR DUMMY WAITER

The side station is also called the dummy waiter or service console. This is a very important piece of furniture in a restaurant. It is used by the service staff for keeping all the service equipment at one place. It is also used as a landing table for the dishes picked up from the kitchen enroute to the table and the dirty dishes from the guest's table to the wash-up area. For the convenience of the service staff, the side station should be strategically located in a restaurant. The side station should be kept clean and presentable as it can be seen by the guests.
The following service equipment can be stored in a side station. Salvers  Creamers  Wine chiller and stand Coffee pots  Teapots  Ice buckets and tongs Finger bowls  Cruet sets  Sugar bowl and tongs Soup ladles  Butter dishes  Bottle and wine openers Cigar cutters  Bread baskets  Bud vases Candle holders  Wine cradle  Toothpick stand Straw stand  Pot holders  Drip bowls

TABLES & CHAIRS

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TABLES & CHAIRS

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TABLES & CHAIRS

The size and shape of tables depends entirely on the
availability of space and the kind of service envisaged. Normally
three types of tables are used. They are round, rectangular and
square.

The height of the table irrespective of the shape should be 75
cm from the floor level. The diameter of a round table to seat four
people should be approximately 92 cm. The size of a square table to
seat two people should 76 cm sq and 92 cm square to seat four
people. The size of rectangular table to seat four people should be
137 cm x 76 cm. Commercial table tops come in a variety of
materials: wood, metal, stone, tile and melamine. Many restaurant
table tops are available with edged finishes to prevent scuffs and
dents.
In some expensive tables, another table top is placed with
revolving facility, on top of which the food is placed where th guests
can rotate revolving top and serve himself, if he chooses to.



Chair are available in various shapes, colours and sizes to
suit all occasions. Because of the wide range…

STAINLESS STEEL

Stainless steel flatware and culery is available in a variety of
grades. Use of stainless steels and super stainless steels is
expanding in a variety of markets. Stainless steels have higher
resistance to oxidation ( rust) and corrosion in many natural and
man made environments; however, it is important to select the
correct type and grade of stainless steel.
Stainless steel is finished by different degrees of polishing:
high polish finish, dull polish finish and a light grey matt, non
reflective finish, etc.
Stainless steel's resistance to corrosion and staining, low
maintenance, relative inexpense and familiar luster make it an ideal
base material for tableware. Stainless steel neither tarnishes nor
stains. It resists scratching far more than other metals and may,
therefore, be said to be more hygienic.

SPECIAL RESTAURANT EQUIPMENTS

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SPECIAL RESTAURANT EQUIPMENTS

There is almost an unlimited range of flatwar, cutlery and
hollowware in use in the catering industry. Apart from the familiar
knife, fork, spoon, vegetable dishes and lids, entrée dishes and lids,
soup tureens, teapot, hotwater jugs, sugar basins there are a
number of specialist items of equipment available for use with
specific dishes. Some common specialist equipments are listed
below:

TABLEWARE

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TABLEWARE

Tableware includes the dishes, glassware, cutlery, and
flatware eating utensils (knives, forks, and spoons) used to set a
table for eating a meal. The nature, variety, and number of objects
varies from culture to culture, and may vary from meal to meal as
well. Tableware may be categorised as follows:
Flatware Flatware denotes all forms of spoon and fork.
Flatware, especially that used by most people when
they eat informally, is usually made of stainless steel.
Cutlery Cutlery refers to knives and other cutting instruments.
Holloware Holloware refers to table service items such as sugar
bowls, creamers, coffee pots, teapots, soup tureens,

hot food covers, water pitchers, platters, butter plates
and other metal items excluding flatware and cutlery.

HANDLING OF CHINAWARE

Whatever quality of china or crockery is used, the most
important thing to ensure is that it is washed, rinsed and dried
correctly to ensure that no dirt, stains or streaks appear.
1) Chinaware has a high breakage rate and, therefore,
needs careful handling.
2) They should be stored on shelves in piles or stakes of
approximately two dozen each. Any higher may result in
their toppling down.
3) They should be stored at a convenient height for placing
on, and removing from the shelves to avoid accidents.
4) Chinaware should be kept covered to prevent dust and
germs settling on it.
5) Chipped and cracked items harbor germs and should,
therefore, not be used and disposed off carefully.

CHINAWARE

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CHINAWARE

China is a term used for crockery whether bone china
(expensive and fine), earthenware (opaque and cheaper) or vitrified
(metallised). Most catering crockery used nowadays tends to be

vitrified earthenware, which is very durable and haven been
strengthened. Crockery is also usually given rolled edges to make it
more chip resistant.
Chinaware is made of silica, soda ash, and china clay, glazed
to give a fine finish. Chinaware can be found in different colours and
designs which are always coated with glaze. Chinaware is more
resistant to heat than glassware. There are various classification of
catering china. They are:
Porcelain Porcelain is a ceramic material made by heating
selected and refined materials, which often includes
clay of kaolinite clay, to high temperatures. The raw
materials for porcelain, when mixed with water, form a
plastic body that can be worked to a required shape
before firing in a kiln at temperatures between 1200°C
and 1400°C. The toughness, strength, and
transl…

HANDLING OF GLASSWARE

1. Glassware is highly fragile and most delicate and
expensive: hence atmost care has to be taken while
handling glass equipments.
2. Glasses are normally stored in a glass pantry and should
be placed upside down in single rows on paper-lined
shelves, to prevent dust settling in them.
3. Tumblers should not be stacked inside one another as
this may result in heavy breakages and accidents.
4. The appearance of the drink mainly depends on the glass
and therefore, the glass should be sparkling clean and
attractive in shape and style.
5. When glassware is machine or hand washed, each
individual item must be polished and dried with a glass
cloth made of linen, as water leaves stains on the
glasses.
6. Glasses whether clean or dirty have to be handled by the
base or stem, since the finger prints left on the glass
necessitates polishing.

TYPES OF GLASSWARE

1. Beer mug
2. 
Brandy snifter
3. 
Champagne flute
4. 
Cocktail glass
5. 
Coffee mug
6. 
Collins glass
7. 
Cordial glass
8. 
Highball glass
9. 
Hurricane glass
10. 
Margarita/coupette glass
11. 
Mason jar
12. 
Old-fashioned glass
13. 
Parfait glass
14. 
Pousse cafe glass
15. 
Punch bowl
16. 
Red wine glass
17. 
Sherry glass
18. 
Shot glass
19. 
Whiskey sour glass
20. 
White wine glass

Beer mug
The traditional beer container. 
Typical Size: 16 oz. Brandy snifter
The shape of this glass concentrates the alcoholic odors to the top of the glass as your hands warm the brandy.
Typical Size: 17.5 oz. Champagne flute
This tulip shaped glass is designed to show off the waltzing bubbles of the wine as they brush against the side of the glass and spread out into a sparkling mousse.
Typical Size: 6 oz. Cocktail glass
This glass has a triangle-bowl design with a long stem, and is used for a wide range of straight-up (without ice) cocktails, including martinis, manhattans, metropolitans, and gimlets. Also known as a martini…

TYPES OF GLASSWARE

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TYPES OF GLASSWARE

Many standard patterns and sizes of glassware are available
to serve each drink. Most glass drinking vessels are either tumblers,
flat-bottomed glasses with no handle, foot, or stem; footed glasses,
which have a bowl above a flat base, but no stem; or stemware,
which have a bowl on a stem above a flat base. Neither a tumbler,
footed, nor a stem, yard (beer) is a very tall, conical beer glass, with
a round ball base, usually hung on the wall when empty.




GLASSWARE

Glassware refers to glass and drinkware items besides
tableware, such as dishes, cutlery and flatware, used to set a table
for eating a meal. The term usually refers to the drinking vessels,
unless the dinnerware is also made of glass. The choice of the right
qulity glass is a vital element if the cocktail is to be invitingly
presented and give satisfaction to the consumer. Well designed
glassware combines elegance, strength and stability, and should be
fine and smooth rimmed and of clear glass.

RESTAURANT EQUIPMENTS

The operating equipments used in hotels / restaurants play
an important role in attracting customers. The restaurant operating
equipments include service equipments, furnitures, fixtures and linen
all of which squarely reflects the standard and style of the restaurant.
The atmosphere of a restaurant is largely affected by the kind of
furniture used.
The furniture should be utilitarian and elegant to look at. Very
often by using different materials, designs and finishes and by
careful arrangement, one can change the atmosphere and
appearance of the food service area to suit different occasions.

Elegant and attractive serviceware, colourful and clean
dishes, quality plates and glassware add to the decor of a restaurant.
However, several factors have to be considered while selecting the
equipment.
· Standard of the restaurant
· Types of service
· Décor and theme of the restaurant
· Type of clientele
· Durability of equipment
· Ease of maintenance
· Availability when stocks runout for replacement
· Storage
· F…

UNDESIRABLE QUALITIES OF A WAITER

i) Forgetting to great the arriving customer pleasantly.
ii) Letting guests seat themselves, inspite of being present near
the table and not otherwise engaged.
iii) Refusing to assist a guest or seating a guest at a dirty table.
iv) Serving from the wrong side, when it is possible to serve from
the correct side
v) Not setting tables properly and placing empty sugar bowls /
cruet sets on the table.
vi) Forgetting to say 'Pardon me', or 'Excuse me, sir / madam, if a
mistake has been made.
vii) Being too familiar with guests. This could lead to embarrassing
situations.
viii) Gathering in groups in operational areas and talking loudly and
showing signs of irritability with other members of the staff.
ix) Leaving fingerprints on crockery / glassware or making a noise
by clattering the service equipment.
x) Keeping the side station dirty or using torn or stained linen.
xi) Forgetting a dish that has been ordered, or serving wrong
accompaniments.
xii) Overfilling water glasses or leaving them empty…

ATTRIBUTES OF A WAITER

The quality of service staff in any establishment reflects the
quality of the establishment itself. No matter how good the food and
ambience are, poorly trained, untidy or rude staff can antagonize
customers. On the other hand, if the staffs are well-trained and

efficient, they can, to a certain extent, make up for other
shortcomings in the services provided.
1) Personal Hygiene and Appearance
· All members of the staff should be well-groomed and clean
at all times, as this gives them a sense of well-being and
confidence to do their job efficiently.
· The hands of the waiting staff should be given special
attention, as they are constantly under the scrutiny of the
guests. Nails should be trimmed, and kept clean. Playing
with one's hair and face should be avoided.
· Chewing gum should be avoided in all public areas of the
hotel.
· Minimum jewellery should be worn by the service staff. A
wrist watch, finger ring and plain earrings (for girls only)
should be permitted.
· If an employee has a skin probl…

STATUS OF A STEWARD

The duties of waiting staff include preparing tables (table
setting) for a meal, taking customers' orders, serving drinks and
food, and cleaning up before, during and after servings in a
restaurant. He must have knowledge of proper rules of etiquette in
order to furnish working service in either a formal or informal sitting.
Other task of a waiter includes:
1. Reports to Senior Captain / Captain to receive necessary
instruction for the shift and for any menu changes.
2. Has to attend briefings conducted by senior captain.
3. Sets the assigned tables and ensures that the services
area too is well-stocked with linen, silver, glassware,
china etc. Sets up any special displays that be used for
the meal period.
4. Greets guests and sometimes assists the host/ hostess in
seating guest. Fills water glasses, serves butter,
cocktails, answers questions about menu items and
makes suggestions about dishes and wine if the customer
requests or desires.
5. Takes orders on check, turns or gives over with
specifica…

THE STEWARD

Waiting staff, wait staff, or waitstaff are those who work at a
restaurant or a bar attending customers - supplying them with food
and drink as requested promptly and pleasantly.
The waiter is popularly known as a Steward or Commis-de-
Rang. A female who "waits" on tables is often called a waitress. The
gender-neutral server and collective waitstaff can also be used.
Some people prefer to use gender-neutral language, using
waiter indiscriminately for males and females, waitperson, server, or
waitron.

THE STEWARD

The English writer, Wilfred Gowers-Round, wrote a number of
‘Rules for Waiters’ that he called a ‘Manifesto.’
· A waiter's job is to serve and never to impose himself.
· The goal of waiting is inconspicuous but pleasing service.
· Waiters must be clean and smart and should never wear
cologne.
· Under no circumstances should a waiter ever touch a
diner.
· Wine glasses should never be filled too full.
· Unasked for advice should never be offered.
· If diners are content to pour the wine themselves, let
them.
· Unless asked, no plates should be removed until all have
been finished.
· Women diners should be afforded respect equal to men.
· While attending to the customer, the waiter should make
sure the diner’s coffee cup / water goblet, bread basket,
butter, sugar, cream and clean ashray are kept full at all
times.
· The bill should be placed on the table without ceremony.
· If the diner so desires, the waiter should carry the money
to the cash counter, pay the bill and return the balace to
the diner.

THE STEWARD

A successful restaurant is one which the guests are anxious to visit again, a place where they feel as comfortable as in their own homes. This pleasant atmosphere is produced by courtesy; good well-cooked food; advice in selecting from the available dishes; a knowledge of how they are prepared; and quiet, efficient, but unostentatious, service. It is by these amenities that both buyer and seller are satisfied and goodwill of the business increased. At the end of the visit the customer is made to feel that he got his money’s worth in terms of both quality food and courteous service. Good waiters are necessary to the success and development of the hotel and catering industry. Waiters play an important part as, in effect, an efficient salesman of food, one who assists materially in merchandising and its accompanying services. Waiter is in direct contact with the guests and therefore much of catering establishment’s success depends on the skills, interest and personable qualities of the waiter. The wait…